The Big Map
The Big Map Page
The Big Map
Colorado River Aqueduct Map

Posted Wednesday October 20th 2021

The Big Map Patton Museum Statue
The Big Map Patton Museum Plaque
The Big Map
The Big Map

  6:31 Video from Metropolitan Water District:

Map View:

Colorado River Aqueduct Map
Colorado River Aqueduct Map
Colorado River Aqueduct Map
Colorado River Aqueduct Map

Colorado River Aqueduct Route:
  • The Colorado River Aqueduct begins near Parker Dam on the Colorado River.
  • There, the water is pumped up the Whipple Mountains where the water emerges and begins flowing through 60 miles of siphons and open canals on the southern Mojave Desert.
  • At Iron Mountain, the water is again lifted, 144 feet.
  • The aqueduct then turns southwest towards the Eagle Mountains.
  • There the water is lifted two more times, first by 438 feet to an elevation of more than 1,400 feet, then by 441 feet to an elevation of 1,800 feet above sea level.
  • It then runs through the deserts of the Coachella Valley and through the San Gorgonio Pass.
  • Near Cabazon, the aqueduct begins to run underground until it enters the San Jacinto Tunnel at the base of the San Jacinto Mountains.
  • Some of the water is siphoned off in San Jacinto via the San Diego canal (part of the San Diego Aqueduct that delivers water to San Diego County).
  • On the other side of the mountains the aqueduct continues to run underground until it reaches Lake Mathews.
  • From there, 156 miles of distribution lines, along with eight more tunnels, delivers water to member cities.

Profile View:

Colorado River Aqueduct Profile
Colorado River Aqueduct Profile
Colorado River Aqueduct Profile
Colorado River Aqueduct Profile

70% of the precipitation in the state falls to the North of Sacramento
Los Angeles Water Supplies

Two Water Supplies for Los Angeles:

  • The State Water Projects:
    A series of aqueducts and canals that make up the State and Central Valley Projects then move 75% of that water collected from North of Sacramento to thirsty users in the South. These water supplies provide most of the water for farmers throughout the Central Valley and the population of the greater Los Angeles area. However, parts of California rely on another important source of water: The Colorado River.
  • Colorado River:
    In addition to the resources from Northern California, early water planners like William Mulholland looked east to the Colorado River for new sources. In the early 1930s, California approved the construction of the Colorado River Aqueduct to provide water from the Colorado River to Los Angeles.
Both the State Water and Central Valley Projects rely on snowfall from the Sierra Nevada Mountains in Northern California for water supply.
The Colorado River on the other hand receives most of its supply from a different part of the country. Also, the Colorado River has two major storage facilities in Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

[Hydrowonk Blog]
[https://hydrowonk.com/blog//blog/2014/04/16/the-state-water-project-vs-the-colorado-river/]

The Big Map is at the Patton Museum East of Palm Springs on the 10

General Patton Memorial Museum
62-510 Chiriaco Road
Chiriaco Summit, CA 92201

General Patton Museum T-Shirt

The Big Map